About your Search

20121222
20121230
SHOW
Book TV 65
Today 24
Stossel 13
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 365
SFGTV2 268
CNNW 117
MSNBCW 115
FOXNEWSW 105
KGO (ABC) 94
CSPAN2 92
FBC 82
KPIX (CBS) 69
WBAL (NBC) 58
WMAR (ABC) 57
CSPAN 55
KTVU (FOX) 54
KQED (PBS) 40
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 38
CNBC 36
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1917
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,937 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the government audit and oversight committee today on monday october 29 here in the city and county of san francisco home of the world series champions giants. i am supervisor mark farrell. i am the chair of the committee and joined by supervisor chiu and will be joined by supervisor elsbernd. i want to thank the staff for covering today's meeting. madam clerk do we have any announcements? >> yes. please make sure to silent any electronic devices and items acted upon today will be on the agenda anyplace otherwise stated. q. can you do item one and two together please? >> item one is a hearing and resolution and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this
reporting relationship between the city cio and the departmental cio's functional weakness for city wide problems and partially agree the city's inability to manage these projects in a centralized function could benefit from reporting relationship between the city, cio and department c cio's. number 11. allowing common ict xurchgzs addressed and performed by department by department basis has lead to duplication and unnecessary spending. for this i agree. addressing by individual departments is the reason for duplicative efforts and spending. finding 12. the plan does not include ongoing operational activities and prior funding. for this i agree. the five year plan is a strategic plan and focus on operational activities would be helpful. find be number 13. there are no consolidated budget and staffing plans. partially agree. while there are some efforts there is no accountability and it's not clear who is responsible if spending decisions are not met. now let's get to the first category of recommendations. moving to -- there were a number of recommendations that came out of the
could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating com
really hard with organizations like sf city and code for america and others to make sure that we keep being leaders in technology and celebrating our status, but also implementing the programs to help us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding o
to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormously flattered that you've decided to take time out of your saturday afternoon to come and talk about, about cities. i'm also particularly grateful to the boston book festival for including this book. i, like i think every single one of you, love books, and i'm just thrilled to be part of this amazing thing
work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san
the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question to get your point of view. >> do you want to take that, shannon? >> i think that there is actually quite ah few examples. we can probably talk to this more with smaller cities that are making open data efforts. but what i would say is that it's proven more than the value of the investment. the return that we've gotten just by opening up the data has actually given back more. so, that would be my short answer to it, but i think you probably have more experience working directly with some of the cities. >> so, i grew up in a small city so i care about small cities a lot, 15,000 people, southern illinois. i'm a card nastionv fan. -- cardinals fan. i should say that. the city
to the bring the city policy to the board of interferes in early 2013 and so as brad said i'll go over the policy and then brad will go over three major projects that we are proposing the use of i f d for. and so the port commission is very well aware in 1969, we got our 54 piers nine react activated and we have an extraordinarily large deferred maintenance problem in the magnitude of $2.2 million and what the port earned as an enterprise is not enough to deal with the assets and the defined problems and so one of our major strategies that the port has initiated in the last decade is to find other source and is so we can be successful leveraging the important assets for the future and so this chart really shows all of the growth of all of these other source that are helping ut to solve our problems and the joe bonds that we just spoke of have been important for park improvementings and i s d which, is in the bright blue is a major proposal to help us build critical flay structure for areas that otherwise, we could not afford. and as a commission m o there is an exhibit a in here in y
, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san francisco. these are names we should never forget. we'll see another names as they serve our great city and become our great local heroes. many of these names now on this very wonderful interactive board. tonight celebrate. celebrate the whole month and make sure we remember our heroes and make sure we hon
obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, bo
we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that
compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. they're getting this really deep and rich picture of wha
're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me, i'm a dog owner. maybe i want to take the kids as w
to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man ama
is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several yea
. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map >> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. for those that haven't please take your seats. again we so appreciate you all gathering on today's peace sunday. we appreciate you taking the time. we are certainly grateful for the special guest which we will come to momentarily. let me dispense with some of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition.
. the women come from all over the city. we enjoy the program and we are getting people out to have fun in this beautiful city. >> rec and parks womens' volleyball program is available at richmond rec center. please visit us onli >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city's transit first policy. and what our goal, what the city's goal and the transit first policy is is to make sure that everybody can get around san francisco, that everyone can get to where they need to go. it is an important part of making the economy of san francisco work, to making the quality of life good and better. but it's not just get around san francisco any old way. this is san francisco, and we have values that we bring to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable.
and interior monitoring equipment on the buildings. this operation is performed in the city right of way and all work that the work will density and improve the soil conditions underneath the buildings and not of course, the operations of the buildings and should -- be detected duress the course of the project the s fm ta will be able to use the gouts to -- the probability has successfully acquired the off street properties and easesments to construct the property thus far and has successfully acquired all but right of the temporary construction licenses we are seek this resident luxe to avoid delays to the project schedule and your action today will hal low the project to continue these negotiations without jeopardizing the project schedule i have a brief presentation on the project and to show you how the grouting tools will be stoled installed to protect the buildings central subway is a 1.5-mile extension of the t line providing improved transportation services for 60% of the people that live adjacent to the april line want and have no other form of transportation but central subway
this actually works. it's on my iphone. we have four children. our oldest son is right now attending city college and taking courses from there. we have two daughters going to city public elementary school. and we have a little boy who is 4 years old going to preschool and if we stay in the city, he will be going to the same school as our daughters. so we have been renting in the city for ten years. last year, around this time of year we bought 27-29 sutro with the hope that we can build a home for ourselves and to raise a family in the city. as property owners we understand the requirement when we purchased the two units that we have to maintain the number of units and cannot combine them and cannot reduce footage. so we worked with the architects to meet the city requirements. we are the new family on the block and don't want to be in conflict with our neighbors and we're putting in tremendous time and effort and money to address neighbors' requests to the point that nothing we can do to make the project viable. if you can see the plans is not to build a luxury home, to indulge ourselv
of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend b
and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandho
man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's va
the work that takes place, here to allow all of us to enjoy the city like this could not be wad without a very strong organizing work of our planning committee and so to all of you i want to say thank you again again and particularly again to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our
. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >> thank you. thank you, david. i'm the other ed. happy holidays, everybody, and thank you for being here. we are initializing our pedestrian safety, pedestrian strategy, and we've had a task force that have included our police department, our mta, our public
got it -- you have got a city subway particular to ride you got a ticket to ride and ... i don't know why you are riding so light rail. you will do right you will do right city by me and before you get to say good-bye i hope i got a city that is free. you got a ticket to ride and the city is there my city do care yeah .... >> do any other members of public wish to speak or sing with regards to these resolutions? all right seeing none, at this time, we will hear from property owners either of whom if you wish to take up to 15 minutes with reds louis pertaining to their property let me see if their any property owners here who wish to speak on behalf of their property and if you can identify your name and the property you are representing. >> my name is mark and i represent the owners of one 12 stock ton street and 212 strobing ton street. i request that the board deny the resolutions at least with respect to these two properties resolutions one nine one 090 and one nine one 094 and pertaining to one two stock ton stories and two one two stock stonn stories this is the apple fl
.p.a. and furthermore the e pc is work to go install -- throughout the city and we are starting to see some major improvements the city has installed 11 water bottle filling stations to date and there are important reasons to promote tap water it's better for the environment is it saves residents money and cuts down on the sugary consumption of beverages as well. and i also want to invite residents that i'm hold be coffee hours on ole gai ass cafe on the outer rich mopped and then my evening hours have a bear with me at steins on clement street and eight avenue near the old colosseum theater and on sat i'll be joining with the justice committee commemorating the 75th anniversary of the terrible tragedy 75 year ago at the chinese cultural center. the rest i'll submit. >> thank you mr. avalos. >> colleague i have one item for intrusion today it's an ordinance that would require the wick epipark commission to hold information hearing on permit complications for large scale multiday events in our parks only this will help the lincoln's park outreach around these expeftsz promote public trust an
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
everybody that we emphasize pedestrian use, more walking in the city, but also the safetiness of it by safety areas. with our school districts, obviously working with walk sf and the wonderful leadership in our schools and in our communities, educating everybody and helping us create the very good marketing education campaign that we need to remind everybody to do so. and then our health department, of course. they carry the very serious burden of giving us statistics, of what it is on the collision as well as injury rates and reminding us that a healthier city could be one that we reduce the fatalities that happen with pedestrians. so, this is part of that whole strategy. we will consider areas of the city that we will have to lower the speed limit and enforce it and educate people around it, as well as more serious and higher and deeper ways of educating the public and the drivers as well as pedestrians themselves. this is all part of i think a good strategy, one that i'm very willing to lead and make sure every department and all of the store fronts along here, as well as p
health fun and make the experience of health about exploring this great city that we're in and then showing the long-term health benefits of doing so. right now we're looking for beta users in the city and we'll launch in about a month or two. thank you very much. we're really happy to be here. (applause) >> cool, we're going to do a short panel talking about the state of open data and sort of what specifically some of these companies are doing which you've gotten a brief peek on. again, you're probably familiar with, already know who a lot of these people are. really quick go down and have everyone introduce them self. >> hello,ishv. my name is ian kalen, hottved by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their dai
for victims. any initiative that can reduce guns in my opinion will make the streets and the cities and counties -- cities like san francisco a much safer place to live. i thank you for your time this morning. >> thank you, doctor. today we're focused on ammunition and immediate interruption in the behavior that law enforcement advises us and sees every day that leads to more violence. in the weeks and months to come, the board and the mayor's office will be introducing both more ideas and legislation and resolutions to support federal and state efforts in the same direction. at the same time, we'll also be introducing through our budget support for an ongoing organizing in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,937 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)